Tag Archives: weirdness

Félix Carvajal and the 1904 Olympics

I first heard of this story on Knowable here, and it seemed so crazy that I had to check it out for myself. Turns out it was true. Félix de la Caridad Carvajal y Soto, known as Félix Carvajal or Andarín … Continue reading

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CSS Shenandoah

Just another quick reblog today. I found this on Futility Closet’s blog here. “The Civil War didn’t quite end with Lee’s surrender. The Confederate man-of-war CSS Shenandoah was in the Arctic Ocean at the time, and kept attacking Union ships … Continue reading

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Regency Slang – Section C

I found this list of vocabulary and slang from The Regency Assembly Press, here. I’m only picking a few excerpts, so visit their site for the full list. Cackling Farts–Eggs Calf-Clingers–Pantaloons. Canterbury Story–A long roundabout tale. Caps – Pull Caps–To … Continue reading

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Jesse James: Modern Robin Hood

Just a quick story today. I found this on Futility Closet’s blog here. As many of you know, Jesse James has been compared to Robin Hood in that he pretty much exclusively robbed from the rich. I don’t believe he … Continue reading

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Song of the South

Just a quick reblog today. I found this story on Futility Closet’s blog here. During the course of the American Civil War “generals planned to hear the course of the struggle — and, in some cases, the sounds never arrived. … Continue reading

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Adrift

Just a quick reblog today. I found this story on Futility Closet’s blog here. “En route to Senegal in 1816, the French frigate Méduse ran aground on a reef. The six boats were quickly filled, so those who remained lashed … Continue reading

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Benjamin Bathurst

I found this story on Futility Closet’s blog here. “On Nov. 25, 1809, British diplomat Benjamin Bathurst was preparing to leave the small German town of Perleberg. He stood outside the inn, watching his portmanteau being loaded onto the carriage, … Continue reading

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