Tag Archives: science

The Kearton Brothers

I first heard of this story on QI (series “O”, episode “Organisms”). The story is about two brothers, Richard and Cherry Kearton, who were the world’s first wildlife photographers. They began photographing things in nature in 1892, when Cherry took the … Continue reading

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The Great Balloon Riot of 1864

I first heard of this story by Jeremy Clay on the BBC here. The English aeronaut Henry Tracey Coxwell became a minor celebrity in 1862 from a feat of derring-do. He and the meteorologist Dr James Glashier decided to carry … Continue reading

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Song of the South

Just a quick reblog today. I found this story on Futility Closet’s blog here. During the course of the American Civil War “generals planned to hear the course of the struggle — and, in some cases, the sounds never arrived. … Continue reading

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Colonel William Shy

Remember how I did a post last week on the Fisk Mummy? Well, I found yet another bit of weirdness involving Fisk coffins (this time found on the StrangeRemains blog here). “William Shy was a colonel in the 20th Tennessee infantry of … Continue reading

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The Fisk Mummy

I originally found this story on Atlas Obscura’s blog here. Anything in quotations is from that blog. I’ve also done some additional research of my own. Let’s talk today about the Fisk Burial Case, or the “Fisk Mummy”, a coffin … Continue reading

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Euphonia of Philadelphia

I found this story on an episode of QI (series N, episode “Next”). In 1845, a German inventor named Joseph Faber built a machine called Euphonia of Philadelphia that attempted to simulate human speech. It also had the face and torso … Continue reading

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The Earth is Flat

I’ve been reading Umberto Eco’s really fun text, The Book of Legendary Lands (2013) and discovered a fun Victorian fact. Everyone knows that in the medieval era, everyone thought the world was flat, and Columbus discovered the Americas in part because … Continue reading

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